What is PLYO???

Have you ever heard of an athlete having to do 100 jump squats to make them jump higher for basketball? Many coaches believe that by incorporating a lot of jump training, also known as “plyometric training,” athletes will jump higher or be more explosive. This can be correct, to a certain extent…

Athletes, or anyone for that matter, can only exert so much force to produce power during training. Overtraining is something we see a lot of in high school programs with coaches who may lack a certain degree of education. Repeating a certain exercise 100 times will not result in any more benefit than doing the exercise 10 times with 110% effort!!! If anything, doing that many jump squats could eventually lead to joint pain from the continuous hard impact/strain on the knees. This could lead to muscle fatigue and decreased performance.

Plyometric training can be a very delicate subject to work with when it comes to your athlete in elementary, middle, or high school. There are levels to how intense their training should be, an example being why we don’t typically see an 8-year-old performing 135 pound back squats like the 17-year-old in the session after him. While younger athletes are still forming growth plates, higher intensity depth jumps and plyometrics are not recommended. They work their way up by perfecting their form and using proper body mechanics.

Back to our athletes performing 100 jump squats to try to increase their power off of the floor vertically (get a higher jump), let’s think logically…